OPINION

Photo Essay: Courtland Gallery, the Gambier Parry Collection, Islamic Metalwork 3/3

June 07, 2010
Dr Bhaskar Dasgupta

Gambier Parry spent quite a lot of time collecting these amazing pieces. These are brassware inlaid with gold and silver, made in various Middle Eastern Countries between 1200 and 1500 AD. As usual, I am not showing all the items that I photographed in this essay, for the full list in bigger resolution, please see the full slide show.

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

Small display case. These pieces are a combination of products made for export to Europe (top shelf) and for domestic use (bottom shelf).

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

A candlestick holder from Turkey, late 13th century, bronze, engraved and inlaid with silver.



metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

This is a wallet, bronze with gold and silver inlay, from Tabriz, Western Iran, around 1300 AD. This shows 16 medallions all over the wallet, with musicians and horsemen. Very fine detailed work.

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery
metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

A bucket with a swing handle from Anatolia around 1500 AD, extremely fine work.

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery
metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

A bowl with a cover, and on the lip of the bowl, one can make out a signature of the maker, namely Master Mahmud. Pretty neat, in both Arabic and Roman script.

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

On the left is a Mamluk bowl from Egypt, around 1300 AD, brass, and inlaid with silver. It would be used for water or food. You can make out the Arabic inscription in the middle, these are honorific's for the user which would have been inscribed into the bowl. On the right is a Mamluk inkwell from the same time, same workmanship, possibly from Syria.


metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery
metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

A bowl shaped box with a cover from Syria, Mamluk times, around 1500 AD. Could be used to store sweets or spices.

metalwork,Middle East,Courtland Gallery

This is a Syrian incense burner, half of it at least. Used in Italian households, these are made out of brass and inlaid with silver. Apparently these would have been ferociously expensive for their time and even more expensive when you include the cost of the very expensive fragrances such as musk and sandalwood.

Now we come to the end of my journey at Courtland Gallery. As i mentioned, it is perhaps one of the world’s best small galleries, one can see the entire gallery in half a day. Lovely place and highly recommended.

Dr. Bhaskar Dasgupta works in the city of London in various capacities in the financial sector. He has worked and travelled widely around the world. The articles in here relate to his current studies and are strictly his opinion and do not reflect the position of his past or current employer(s). If you do want to blame somebody, then blame my sister and editor, she is responsible for everything, the ideas, the writing, the quotes, the drive, the israeli-palestinian crisis, global warming, the ozone layer depletion and the argentinian debt crisis.
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Photo Essay: Courtland Gallery, the Gambier Parry Collection, Islamic Metalwork 3/3

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Author: Dr Bhaskar Dasgupta

 

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